Benefits of a Multi Generational Advisory Firm

Many clients of financial advisors share a common concern and fear. Because the process of finding an individual to trust with their money is not something to be taken lightly, this concern can be magnified. Clients wonder what happens to them if their financial advisor retires or unexpectedly dies. This is a legitimate concern. As a result they have been deemed physically or mentally incapable of handling your finances. This commonly voiced concern is why advisory firms and the financial industry have begun focusing more on succession planning and multi-generational advisory teams.

Built In Transition Planning 
Life is unpredictable and we cannot predict the future. What we do know is that change and growing older are inevitable. Just as you are working hard to save enough to retire, your financial advisor is doing the same. Multi-generational advisory firms have a built-in transition plan. These firms are acclimating their newer and younger associates with current clients. They are leveraging the experience and wisdom that the senior advisors have gained to help train and guide newer associates. Newer advisors will gain experience, knowledge and expertise in the field while working with senior partners. This built in transition plan ensures continuity and no disruption of service to the client. While this won’t happen over night and will require a lot of work, this type of planning is in the client’s best interest. Feeling confident that your advisors have a plan for you and your future should be encouraging and expected. Multi-generational family practices offer an additional dynamic where family life, familiarity and genetics can also contribute to the trust factor.

Experience And Wisdom Meet New Technology And Expanded Communications
As an advisor enters into the industry, there is one valuable thing that all of the studying, textbooks, and exams cannot provide experience. Experience is undeniably an important attribute when looking at an advisor. This can only be obtained with time and is something every new associate has to go through “on the job”. Multi-generational advisory firms are more prepared to alleviate this concern. While they cannot completely eliminate this, aging advisors are able to pass down their experience and wisdom to the next generation of advisors through training and mentorship. This is extremely valuable asset for any new advisor in the field and can play a huge role in their development and client successes. The veteran advisor also stands to benefit from this relationship. After doing things the same way for a number of years, a fresh new outlook and access to new communication tools will be of tremendous help to the senior advisor and their clients.

Sales Tricks

1. The Probe
On your first contact with any salesperson, they’ll usually ask you a few questions. These have two main goals. Most obviously, they’re trying find out what you’re looking for. But they’re also aimed at finding out how serious you are about buying.

2. The Psychology Test
To be successful in selling to you, a seller must quickly work out what kind of a person you are so they can adjust their sales pitch to appeal to someone like you. If you’re a positive, extrovert, glass-half-full person, then they’ll probably try to sell the dream – stress how what they’re selling will improve your life. But if you’re more of a glass-half-empty worrier, then the seller will sell security – focus more on the features and performance of what’s being sold.

3. The Make-a-Friend
Sellers will have many tricks to make us like them as the more we like someone, the more likely we are to buy from them. One of the most frequently used techniques is called active listening. With active listening the seller will use all kinds of non-verbal gestures such as leaning forward, inclining their head slightly to one side, widening their eyes, pursing their lips thoughtfully and stroking their chin to show their interest in us. Some sellers even sit in front of the mirror at home practising their active listening skills.

4. The Trust Me
Many salespeople are trained to portray themselves as trusted advisers helping us make the right buying decision rather than being seen as commission-hungry vultures slavering to get hold of our money. One of many ways of achieving this is the same side of the table. Rather than standing or sitting opposite the customer creating a situation where the seller and buyer are like adversaries facing each other, the seller changes their position so they’re standing or sitting almost beside the customer as if they’re working together with the customer to solve the customer’s problem – which house, car, TV, phone or insurance to buy.

5. The Persuaders
Having managed to get us interested in buying something, the seller then needs to get us to make the decision to move ahead. To put pressure on us, they might try the closing door – suggest there’s only a limited time to get the deal they’re offering; or the phantom buyer tell us there are other people interested in buying what we want even if this isn’t true; auction fever use other real or phantom buyers to make us feel we have to offer a higher price if we’re to get what we want; or even the deliberate mistake when adding up the price of something, they deliberately forget some small part so that the buyer, thinking they’re smarter than the seller, rushes to complete the deal.